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Celebrating International Epilepsy Day

International Epilepsy Day is observed annually on the 11th of February, and is most commonly referred to as Purple Day, since lavender is the colour for epilepsy awareness.

This day is observed to inform people about this neurological disorder, marked by sudden recurrent episodes of sensory disturbance, loss of consciousness, or convulsions, associated with abnormal electrical activity in the brain.

The observation of this day was initiated by the International Bureau for Epilepsy in 2015, and has gone on to gain traction around the world ever since. This day serves to provide a platform for people with epilepsy to share their different experiences and to inform each other about the different types of treatments available for their illness.

It also seeks to quell the stigma, misconceptions and stereotypes surrounding the disease as many people do not understand the disease more especially on the African continent where diagnosis and treatment is hard to come by. 65 Million people around the world suffer from epilepsy, and statistics show that four to 10 people out of 1000 are likely to develop epilepsy in their lifetime, while six out of 10 people living with epilepsy do not know what caused their disease.

Statistics also reveal that four out of 10 people in the world do not get the appropriate treatment to manage their epilepsy, and unfortunately that number rises to eight out of every 10 people in Africa who do not get the appropriate treatment. It is for these reasons that this day is important to socialize information on the disease to the public.
Staff members who live or are affected by epilepsy at the SABC are encouraged to visit the Wellness Center and get the appropriate medical advice on the disease and prescription to manage this disease.

By Elon Mogale

This day is observed to inform people about this neurological disorder, marked by sudden recurrent episodes of sensory disturbance, loss of consciousness, or convulsions, associated with abnormal electrical activity in the brain.

The observation of this day was initiated by the International Bureau for Epilepsy in 2015, and has gone on to gain traction around the world ever since. This day serves to provide a platform for people with epilepsy to share their different experiences and to inform each other about the different types of treatments available for their illness.

It also seeks to quell the stigma, misconceptions and stereotypes surrounding the disease as many people do not understand the disease more especially on the African continent where diagnosis and treatment is hard to come by.

65 Million people around the world suffer from epilepsy, and statistics show that four to 10 people out of 1000 are likely to develop epilepsy in their lifetime, while six out of 10 people living with epilepsy do not know what caused their disease.

Statistics also reveal that four out of 10 people in the world do not get the appropriate treatment to manage their epilepsy, and unfortunately that number rises to eight out of every 10 people in Africa who do not get the appropriate treatment. It is for these reasons that this day is important to socialize information on the disease to the public.

Staff members who live or are affected by epilepsy at the SABC are encouraged to visit the Wellness Center and get the appropriate medical advice on the disease and prescription to manage this disease.

By Elon Mogale, SABC Corporate Communications

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